Nutrition Later In Life

People are always looking to get fit. Let’s face it, everyone likes to look and feel good. So much to the point that people are constantly changing their diet or workout plan. We all look to very similar dietary foods that will help, greek yogurt, lemons, assorted vegetables, fruits, fish, nuts, etc. Without thought, we think we’re doing things right, but are we? We should start making changes to our diet based on where we are in life. What I mean by this is our nutritional needs change later in life.

imgres-13As we get older, our bodies tend to change and that’s life. But what attributes to factors like this? Why is it as we get older, our value on nutrition declines as does our health. For one, as we get older, people tend to rely on medications for whatever complications or need that there is. Often times these medications can lead to a decline in appetite. Another factor is our changes in taste, smell, ability to swallow, digestion, and ability to chew. These changes can lead to us choosing different foods. Lets face it, something like an apple may be easier for 21 year old you to eat than 75 year old you just due to the fact that apples require a strong bite. Two things we should pay closer attention to as we get older are the following:

Caloric Intake

By age 40, your body is just about used to what you have been eating normally over that time. At this time in life, you no longer need this many calories that you had been consuming for 40 years. It can be tough to make such a drastic change but it’s only better for the body. This is not just at one point. Each year after 40 your caloric intake declines. So while you won’t have to make a huge change at the dawn of 40, just know that year in and year out, maybe you’ll have to lose something that was once apart of your everyday diet.

Sarcopenic Obesity

What sarcopenic obesity is a condition in which a person begins to put on fat mass and lose lean mass. As you age, you lose muscle mass and your BMR (basal metabolic rate) declines and you begin to generate a positive caloric balance which in essence adds body fat. The worst part about this condition is that your weight won’t change, only your body fatness.

For more on this interesting take, check out this article here.

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Foods to Pay Close Attention to in 2015

At the turn of the new year, many people are looking to make drastic changes to help make 2015 a better year than 2014. Some like to change how they spend their money, some like to change their work out regiment, and others change their diet. People are always looking to fix the way they look. While many turn to working out more, a lot can be accomplished as well with a change in diet. You don’t always have to have a full turnover in diet. By eliminating a few bad foods and adding a few healthy foods, you can begin to make a slow but subtle change in your diet. Lets take a look at some of the healthiest foods on the planet that you can begin to slowly incorporate into your diet.

Lemons

Obviously you would not want to have a whole lemon by itself, but did you know a lemon has more than 100% of your daily intake of vitamin C? If you could somehow find a way to work in just a half a lemon into your diet a day and come up with another way to incorporate vitamin C, you could make big strides.

Broccoli

I know what you’re thinking, duh of course I know broccoli is good for me but do you know how good? One medium stalk of broccoli has over 100% of your necessary daily vitamin K intake. It even himgres-12as close to 200% of your daily dose of vitamin C. I can see it now, a slice of lemon and some broccoli on your dinner plate.

Dark Chocolate

I know what your thinking, chocolate? Can’t be. If you have the right kind of chocolate, dark, it is in fact good for you. Just a quarter ounce a day can help reduce blood pressure. Its also rich in antioxidants which helps keep cholesterol levels down.

Potatoes

Want a way to avoid broccoli or spinach? One red potato has 66 micrograms of cell building folate, which is essentially the same amount found in one cup of either broccoli or spinach.

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Fitness Apps to Help Achieve Results

Nowadays it seems everyone always has their head down glued to their phone. What if we could make working out interactive? What if there were some top of the line apps that could help you achieve top fitness results. This way people could be on their phone essentially and still working out. Here are a couple of apps that can help you achieve your fitness goals:

Cody

The app Cody is essentially the Facebook of fitness. Like Facebook, you can follow/friend other users and share workouts and videos of workouts to make it interactive. You can also track your progress to help see how you have been doing. The app is free and is available for iOS.

Hot5 Fitness

imgres-12This app really break a work out down into step by step instruction by top of the line fitness instructors in order to maintain proper technique. The type of work out ranges from your basic core work out to weights to yoga. They also include five minute to forty-five minute workout videos to help give users a visual in order to make sure things are being done correctly. A huge advantage of this app is you do not need to be connected to wifi. This app can be used anywhere. The app can be free but used in a limited capacity or you can pay $2.99 a month for unlimited access. The app is available for iOS.

Pact

This app may be the most interesting of them all. Formerly known as GymPact, Pact will pay you if you do in fact go to the gym or complete your workout that you had previously scheduled. What happens is you pledge X amount of dollars and are paid out somewhere between .30 cents and $5 a week. The money comes from the pool of money initially set up from everyones pledge. Those who don’t make it to all their scheduled workouts are essentially rewarding those who do.

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